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We only sell our best value Annual Passports online. Single attraction tickets are available on the gate.

Family (1 Adult + their children)

This ticket offers daytime admission to all 10 museums for a family of 1 adult + all of their children (aged 5-16 incl). Annual Passport Tickets are valid for 12 months from the date of first use. Plus save 5% online compared to the walk-up price if you buy online in advance.

Walk up price £50.00

Online saver £47.50

Family (2 Adults + their children)

This ticket offers daytime admission to all 10 museums for a family of 2 adults + all of their children (aged 5-16 incl). Annual Passport Tickets are valid for 12 months from the date of first use. Plus save 5% online compared to the walk-up price if you buy online in advance.

Walk up price £70.00

Online saver £66.50

Adult

Daytime admission to all 10 museums valid for 12 months from the date of first use. Plus you can save 5% by buying online, compared to the walk-up price.

Walk up price £26.50

Online saver £25.15

Child/Student

Daytime admission to all 10 museums valid for 12 months from the date of first use for children aged 5-16 (incl), or people in full time education. Plus save 5% online compared to the walk-up price if you buy online in advance.

Walk up price £16.50

Online saver £15.65

Senior 60+

Daytime admission to all 10 museums valid for 12 months from the date of first use. Suitable for anyone aged 60 or over, plus save 5% online compared to the walk-up price.

Walk up price £20.50

Online saver £19.45

Add on a Blists Hill Guide Book

Don't miss out! Pre-purchase a souvenir guide, to be collected with your tickets on arrival at Blists Hill Victorian Town. The guide is already great value so we can't offer an online discount.

Walk up price £4.95

Online saver £4.95

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The Machinery


Making its premier at the Ironbridge Gorge World Heritage Festival 2018The Machinery Installation is a new collaborative art work by Caroline Radcliffe (clog dancer), Sarah Angliss (composer and digital artist) and Jon Harrison (digital film maker). The work has been brought to Ironbridge in recognition of the area's industrial heritage and popular title of Birthplace of the Industrial Revolution.

The three screen, immersive, sound and visual installation expresses the dehumanisation and alienation of the industrial worker  - relentlessly subjected to an exhausting cycle of repetition.

The ‘heel-and-toe’ clog steps are layered with looped sounds taken from a working, 19th century cotton mill and a 21st century call centre, emphasising the connections between the two industries.

The Machinery will be available to view in the Engine Shop at Enginuity from Thursday 20 September - Wednesday 26 September 2018 and is free of charge. If visitors wish to visit Enginuity or any of the other Ironbridge Gorge Museums, standard admission charges apply.

The machinery of the Industrial Revolution soon replaced human actions, demanding that the people operating them became mechanical, with workers  themselves reduced to human automata. In Das Kapital (1867), Karl Marx warned against the processes of the perpetuum mobile  and the consequent automatisation essential to the success of capitalism. The process is repeated in contemporary call centres, many of which occupy the spaces that once housed the textile industries, with global outsourcing a shared feature of the 19th and the 21st century.

The dance steps of The Machinery were passed on to Radcliffe by East-Lancashire clog dancer, Pat Tracey (1927 - 2008), who could trace them, via her own family, directly back to the early nineteenth century. The Machinery  therefore predates more recent forms of machine dance (such as the Futurist dances of the early-twentieth century) by over one hundred years. By appropriating the movements and sounds of industrial machinery, the dance might be viewed as a creative resistance to automisation by the worker.  Steps are named after or mimic the mechanical components and actions of the cotton machines – ‘the pick’, ‘over-the-tops’, ‘two-up-two-down’, ‘weaving’, ‘shunts’ and ‘the cog’.

The Machinery is supported by Arts Council England and the University of Birmingham

Compton Verney Art Gallery, Warwickshire is featuring Radcliffe and Angliss’s original performance of The Machinery in “The Marvellous Mechanical Museum” exhibition until 30 September. Click here for details.  Filmed live at the Algomech Festival of Algorithmic and Mechanical Movement in 2016, the performance provided the inspiration for Jon Harrison’s new installation, premiered at Ironbridge Gorge Museums.

 

Biography of the artists

  • Caroline Radcliffe is a theatre maker, musician and theatre historian. She performs nationally and internationally and is a senior lecturer in Drama and Theatre Arts at the University of Birmingham. She is also a clog dancer, taught by Pat Tracey, specialising in the East Lancashire ‘heel-and-toe’ style of dance. Radcliffe danced with Tracey’s clog team, ‘Camden Clog’. 
  • Sarah Angliss is a composer, performer, sound historian and robotic artist. Her composition combines ancient instruments with electronics, field recordings and her own robotic creations. Her music often explores the uncanny, the automaton and the connections between folklore and early machines. Sarah performs live and creates music for theatre, film and installations - her work has been heard throughout Europe and the USA.
  • Jon Harrison is a filmmaker and creative director of Lovebytes Digital Arts. He has been involved in digital arts for over 25 years, commissioning and producing a wide range of innovative projects combining creative technology, arts education, heritage and digital preservation. He has recently produced films for Bradford Museums and Galleries, National Arts Education Archive and the Children’s Media Conference and co-founded of the Algomech Festival of Algorithmic and Mechanical Movement in 2016.

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